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Past Events › CRITICAL x DESIGN

04/19/19

CRITICAL x DESIGN: Lucy Suchman

In June of 2018, following a campaign initiated by activist employees within the company, Google announced its intention not to renew a US Defense Department contract for Project Maven, an initiative to automate the identification of military targets based on drone video footage. Defendants of the program argued that that it would increase the efficiency and effectiveness of US drone operations, not least by enabling more accurate recognition of those who are the program’s legitimate targets and...
12:00PM - 1:00PM
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04/11/19

CRITICAL x DESIGN: Joy Lisi Rankin

American historians debate whether Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Depression-era legislation was, in fact, a New Deal, or perhaps an “Old Deal” or a “Raw Deal.” Considering multiple perspectives and voices, combined with the long sweep of history, stokes this lively, ongoing debate. In this CRITICALxDESIGN talk, I’ll turn my attention to American computing in the 1960s and 1970s to consider whether the academic networks of that era may be inspiration for...
12:00PM - 1:00PM
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03/27/19

CRITICAL x DESIGN: Ben Grosser

How are numbers on Facebook changing what we "like" and who we "friend"? Why does a bit of nonsense sent via email scare both your mom and the NSA? What makes someone mad when they learn Google can't see where they stand? From net art to robotics to supercuts to e-lit, Ben Grosser will discuss several artworks that illustrate his methods for investigating the culture of software.
12:00PM - 1:00PM
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03/20/19

CRITICAL x DESIGN: Katherine Behar

In “Digitally Divided,” Behar presents her artwork with a focus on how algorithms dismantle and rearrange us. Across culture, algorithms have been unleashed to allocate complex systems into manageable portions. They mete out standardization and suppress idiosyncrasy across diverse and defiant populations of human and nonhuman objects, in ways that are socially, technically, and conceptually reductive. This lecture brings together examples of Behar’s videos, interactive installations, sculptures, and performances, alongside episodes from media history and popular culture to explore this core notion of being “digitally divided.”
3:00PM - 4:00PM
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